Webinar on Centering the Family Experience: What does it mean for Preschool Special Education access across the state?

Webinar Summary

Help Me Grow Long Island was thrilled to partner with Education Trust New York and Kids Can’t Wait Campaign to get the word out regarding the recent report Centering the Family Experience: Implications for Long Island Early Childhood System.

Dr. Victoria Chen, Northwell, & Kristin Lynch, Get Ready to Grow joined us as panelist to discuss statewide experience of the Preschool Special Education Evaluation request process for families. It was great to share our concerns as well as learn about the process across the state that families are struggling with here on Long Island. Together we can work towards a more equitable system for families to access evaluations for children age 3-5! 

On November 5th The Education Trust and Kids Can’t Wait hosted a discussion about Help Me Grow – Long Island’s “Centering the Family Experience: Implications for Long Island’s Early Childhood System.”  In this report, feedback from families led to further exploration of existing quantitative data to identify an under-recognized issue for families: how barriers in registering for the local school district discouraged and delayed families seeking special education evaluation for their young children with suspected developmental delays. The event included a panel to discuss the report’s findings and recommendations.

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Investing in quality early learning programs is the most efficient way to affect school and life success and to reduce social expenditures later.

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