Advocates

Young children’s doctors have the potential to be a critical resource to policymakers and to early childhood advocates. Doctors have tremendous access to children and their families and unique credibility. They are among society’s most trusted messengers and can add a critical voice to your efforts. Many doctors are interested in advocacy opportunities but lack the time and connections to learn how to begin. We encourage you to connect with Docs for Tots to learn how to engage doctors as public champions in your advocacy efforts.
We encourage you to connect with Docs for Tots to learn how to engage doctors as public champions in your advocacy efforts. Docs for Tots believes that there is an opportunity to focus on health and well-being in early childhood advocacy. Strong early childhood policies should include ensuring that kids receive: quality early care and educations, health promotion in all systems that touch children, appropriate developmental screenings, social emotional health promotions, supports and intervention, family support and access to an early childhood medical home. Docs For Tots can link you with doctors and opportunities and can help you frame your issues from a health perspective. Connect with Docs for Tots today. You can:

Latest News

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2020 Highlights For the families that use them, child care providers play a major role in children’s lives. A child who attends child care . . .
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Help Me Grow – Long Island 2020 Highlights

2020 in Numbers Expanded Partnerships in 2020 With support from Help Me Grow National, we strengthened our relationship with the Stony Brook Hospital Women, . . .
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Addressing Basic Needs and COVID Challenges

2020 Highlights 2020 has presented challenges for many families with young children worldwide. Docs for Tots has been fortunate to be able to continue . . .
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Babies make 700 new neural connections per second.

 

Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University