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National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

High rates of child poverty and income inequality in the U.S. can be reduced, but effective, widespread, and long-lasting change will require shifts in both national policy and the economy.

National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Poverty can impede children’s ability to learn and contribute to social, emotional, and behavioral problems.

National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

45 percent of all children in the U.S. – 32.4 million – live in low-income families.  

National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Research is clear that poverty is the single greatest threat to children’s well-being.  

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June 2022

Check out our newsletter and see what we’re up to! In case you missed it – here is our June Newsletter. See what we’re . . .
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Docs for Tots is Hiring: Spanish-speaking Family Resource Specialist

NEW posting June 2022 Part-time or Full-time position with combo of in person and remote work Help Me Grow – Long Island Family Resource . . .
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Job Posting: Program Manager, Quality Improvement Initiatives

Position Description: The Program Manager will oversee and coordinate the day-to-day operations of Docs for Tots Quality Improvement (QI) programs, including Help Me Grow . . .
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Quality early childhood education settings have great potential to transform our nation’s health.

Dina Lieser, MD, FAAP