Docs For Tots Partners to Launch Nassau Thrives

October 29, 2013, Child Care Council of Nassau Receives Superstorm Sandy Social Services Block Grant in Collaboration with Docs for Tots and Adelphi University Institute for Parenting from Governor Cuomo.  The project called NASSAU THRIVES- Building Resiliency in Young Children promotes social emotional health for infants, toddlers and preschoolers through outreach to early care and learning providers, curriculum implementation and support services including an evidence based mental health consultation model which Docs For Tots is overseeing.

The fear and anxiety experienced by young children as a result of exposure to trauma, including natural disasters poses a threat of serious developmental failure.  Early Education and Care venues are poised to support parents and young children and could have a tremendous impact in helping to keep development on track through approaches to prevention and intervention that support natural resiliency in young children and help them to cope in developmentally appropriate ways. Post Hurricane Sandy, Docs For Tots convened an ad-hoc Infant and Early childhood Mental Health Task Force  as part of NY’s Children’s Task Force.

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Investing in quality early learning programs is the most efficient way to affect school and life success and to reduce social expenditures later.

James Heckman, economist, Nobel laureate