Poverty

Poverty is the greatest threat to children’s healthy development. Twenty-five percent of children under age six live in poverty. That’s six million young kids whose parents struggle to afford safe housing, healthy food, and quality early care and learning. Growing up in poverty has long-term consequences for children’s well-being, impacting children’s health, academic achievement, and social-emotional development. The negative effects of poverty are greatest when children are young.

Docs for Tots believes that families need access to a range of supports in order to be financially secure. Young children’s doctors can connect families with important resources, like tax credits, and be advocates for strengthening supports like family leave insurance. Doctors can also be a powerful voice for drawing attention to the health consequences of child poverty.

Docs for Tots:

  • Provides resources, tools, technical assistance and trainings for doctors and early childhood professionals to directly support families’ financial health
  • Provides financial health resources to parents
  • Advocates for strengthening important supports, including family leave insurance, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and food stamps
  • Advocates for policies, investments, and best practices, that get to the root causes of poverty

Latest News

Reflections on Racism and Early Childhood

by Dr. Elizabeth Isakson, Executive Director, Docs for Tots Edward Deming once said: “Every system is perfectly designed to get the result it gets.” . . .
Read More

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Lives of Families with Young Children

  by Melissa Passarelli, Docs for Tots Director of Programs COVID-19 has affected the entire world, but has been most dangerous to those with . . .
Read More

A Portrait of Growth and Impact: Help Me Grow – Long Island

The Help Me Grow – Long Island (HMG-LI) Annual Report is subtitled “A Portrait of Growth and Impact” as it represents a snapshot of . . .
Read More

Research is clear that poverty is the single greatest threat to children’s well-being.

 

National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health