Poverty

Poverty is the greatest threat to children’s healthy development. Twenty-five percent of children under age six live in poverty. That’s six million young kids whose parents struggle to afford safe housing, healthy food, and quality early care and learning. Growing up in poverty has long-term consequences for children’s well-being, impacting children’s health, academic achievement, and social-emotional development. The negative effects of poverty are greatest when children are young.

Docs for Tots believes that families need access to a range of supports in order to be financially secure. Young children’s doctors can connect families with important resources, like tax credits, and be advocates for strengthening supports like family leave insurance. Doctors can also be a powerful voice for drawing attention to the health consequences of child poverty.

Docs for Tots:

  • Provides resources, tools, technical assistance and trainings for doctors and early childhood professionals to directly support families’ financial health
  • Provides financial health resources to parents
  • Advocates for strengthening important supports, including family leave insurance, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and food stamps
  • Advocates for policies, investments, and best practices, that get to the root causes of poverty

Latest News

Docs for Tots is Hiring!

November 2020 Docs for Tots is hiring two part-time Early Childhood Mental Health Consultants. Please share with your networks! Organizational Description: Docs for Tots’ . . .
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Docs for Tots is Hiring!

Docs for Tots is hiring! Share with your networks! November 2020 Position has been filled. Thanks for your interest! . . .
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Some Districts Introduce Online Registration Amidst the Pandemic

by Rose Marie Paul, HMG-LI Family Resource Specialist To meet safety guidelines due to the current pandemic, more and more school districts on Long . . .
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Research is clear that poverty is the single greatest threat to children’s well-being.

 

National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health