Learn the Signs. Act Early. (LTSAE)

Docs for Tots’ Director of Programs, Melissa Passarelli, is the new CDC Act Early Ambassador for New York State! She recently attended a training at the Centers for Disease Control headquarters in Atlanta to learn about how to use this public health campaign to promote developmental milestones in the early years.

Act Early Ambassadors expand the reach of the Learn the Signs. Act Early. program and support their respective state’s work toward improving early identification of developmental delays and disabilities.

Since 2011, professionals with medical, child development, developmental disability, special education, and early intervention expertise have been selected to

  • Serve as a state or territorial point-of-contact for the national “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” program;
  • Support the work of Act Early Teams and other state/territorial or national initiatives to improve early identification of developmental delay and disability; and
  • Promote the adoption and integration of “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” resources into systems that serve young children and their families.

As an Act Early Ambassador, Melissa will continue to promote developmental milestones and early identification among families and providers across New York State!

Review the CDC’s Developmental Milestones and access the CDC’s Milestone Tracker App below.

CDCs Milestone tracker app


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