Current Projects

What We Do

Docs for Tots fosters connections between young children’s doctors, policymakers, early childhood practitioners, and other stakeholders. We take a two-pronged approach to improving children’s health and chances of success, simultaneously promoting: 1) Policy innovation; and 2) Practice transformation.

POLICY INNOVATION

To create comprehensive systems that support children’s healthy development, Docs for Tots:

  • Brings doctor’s expertise to the early childhood policy arena
  • Builds a network of doctors to support policy improvements
  • Educates the public, policy makers and others about the importance of investments in early childhood

PRACTICE TRANSFORMATION

To ensure that doctors and other professionals who work with young children have all the tools they need to allow children to thrive, Docs for Tots:

  • Develops and shares information to improve medical practice for the youngest children
  • Connects doctors to community early childhood resources
  • Creates and shares essential resources for medical educators
  • Provides technical assistance to professionals across multiple disciplines who work with young children

Latest News

Board Certified Physicians Participating in the Docs for Tots’ “Well Moms, Well Tots” Program to Receive Credit for Quality and Practice Improvement Activities

NEW YORK– August 7, 2017 – The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) has announced that Docs for Tots has joined ABMS’ Multi-Specialty Portfolio . . .
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PR Intern Ashley Farrell on Well Moms, Well Tots: Maternal Depression

In almost every health-related course I have took in school, the curriculum covers the same information: drugs and alcohol, mental health, chronic and communicable . . .
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Meet The Staff!

Ashley Farrell, PR Intern Ashley Farrell has been a PR Intern for Docs for Tots since November 2016. She received her Bachelor’s of Science . . .
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Investing in quality early learning programs is the most efficient way to affect school and life success and to reduce social expenditures later.

James Heckman, economist, Nobel laureate