Parents

Developmental Screening

Did you know that all children should have a developmental screening at 9, 18, 24 and 30 months, or at any point that you have a concern? Screening offers the opportunity to identify early any areas that need support so that children have the best chance to succeed. Unfortunately, screening does not happen routinely in many practices. Your voice is an important one in making sure your child receives the screening he or she needs.

Developmental screenings can happen in a variety of places—including at the doctor’s office, or in your child’s early care and education setting. Talk to your health care provider about what screening process they have in place and any time you have a concern about your children’s development. Your child’s early care and education provider can be a great resource for any questions or concerns regarding your child’s healthy development.

In order to make sure that your child is screened at the appropriate times, you can:

  • Ensure that the screens happen at 9, 18, 24 and 30 month well child visits
  • Raise any concerns you have about your child’s development with your health care provider and other trusted professionals
  • Proactively encourage your child’s development – your child care provider should have ideas, or explore for developmentally appropriate activities
  • Seek help when you have concerns

Priority Issues

Champions

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Stable, caring relationships are essential for healthy development.

Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University